jumping off a bridge

Over the past few months, in several places and conversations online (not to mention several places out here in the real world over the last few decades), I’ve come across stories of seemingly well-intentioned young “Westerners” (i.e., white folks) who have gotten discouraged because some Asian Buddhist teacher has failed to allow him or her entrance into the “true path.” I’ve seen a stream of references to instances where white folks were “shut out” of Asian Buddhist communities. Or something. Often, these stories are used to counter the arguments of folks like myself who like to point out that, yes Virginia, there is (white) racism in American Buddhism.

Something about this line of reasoning really bugs me.

revisiting an old thread

I thought I’d revisit an article (and my response to it) by Clark Strand on American Buddhism, raising Buddhist children, and other sticky issues like baby boomers and white folk. Being a big believer in allowing one’s opinions to grown, mature, and even change over time, I thought I’d reassess my position and see if my own opinion had done just that.

podcasts and other things

The new episode of the DharmaRealm is up (go listen! now!) in which we talk about American Shin Buddhist practice. One of the things we recognize is that the BCA is very much “family Buddhism.” This is a double-edged sword, of course. One the one hand, it acknowledges that people have families, they have kids and jobs and lives, and it can be very difficult to practice Buddhism. So the BCA creates a space that is extremely open and welcoming to anyone complete with Dharma Schools for the kids. But this can also be really difficult for the solitary practitioner. It can be hard to find your place in a century-old community where there are long-standing family networks if you yourself don’t have a family or pre-exisiting ties. It’s a real problem, and Harry and I certainly don’t solve the issue in this one episode, but I was excited to have a chance to talk about it regardless.

compartmentalization

There is a tendency in the modern world to compartmentalize. To keep various aspects of our lives separate. To say, “this is my home life, this is my work life, this is my private life, this is my public life, this is political life, this my spiritual life. They’re separate spheres of activity. Distinct and isolated.”

And I think this is pretty much a bunch of crap.

mythical august has arrived!

First off, the wedding was spectacular. It was at terns beautiful, sentimental, silly, deeply romantic, spiritual, and a helluva lot of fun. It still astounds me how much work other people put into making something so beautiful for me and Dana. The insecure little kid who lives in my head is surprised that people actually like him. Go figure.

damn it!

So I’m looking at my last entry and thinking to myself, That’s all well and good, Scott, but it’s sort of a dull entry. I mean, it lacks anything particularly insightful or interesting or revelatory. I know no one’s really expecting me to be brilliant all the time, but the entry reads like someone who’s […]