editors and producers

It started with a short bit I read (via Loden Jinpa) about the demise of publishers due to the rise of e-book readers. It suggests that in five year’s time, Amazon, Apple, whomever, will cut out the “middle-man” of traditional publishers and work with authors directly to deliver content to our devices of choice. It really is a short bit, and I didn’t have time this week to read the article it’s referencing. And, let’s be honest, this is an an area of expertise that’s a little far-afield for me. (Like, for example, the article suggests that the iTunes Music Store is circumventing music labels. That’s not actually true, is it?) Nevertheless, it raises some interesting questions for me.

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you shouldn’t be afraid

There is something much more deliberate about listening to music on vinyl. This is something you do, something you must be mindful of. I can hit the “shuffle” button on iTunes, walk away, do the dishes, hang out with the dog, get a sandwich — and the music becomes background noise. But with a record, you need to be singularly conscious of what you’re doing. You need to take great care when sitting down to listen to the disc. And in the case of In Rainbows, you need even more care because the album is spread over two records with just two to three songs per side. Which means there’s a lot of getting up and flipping discs involved. You’re forced to listen.

twenty-four

In other, other, other, news, once the Dissertation has been defended, I expect everyone to call me Dr. Scott. No wait. That’s not what I was going to say. Once Thursday rolls around, I’ll be posting something more, oh, I don’t know, Buddhist. Unless of course my Radiohead boxset ever shows up. In which case maybe I’ll talk about the difference between digital downloads, CDs, and vinyl. I don’t know. But I do know this: maybe I’ll be just a little be less distracted.